It’s not often that Haute Couture looks and themes are relatable for us design geeks. Sometimes there are just too many jewels, monochrome palettes, pastel colours, and high-end fabrics that make us turn our heads towards the local design gallery for inspiration instead of something that resembles the set of a debutante ball. But last month, the Paris Haute Couture Autumn/Winter 2016-17 shows included a stellar line-up of inspirational interiors that would be relatable just about anywhere. The cross-over of kitsch and beautiful designs were inspiring for small and large spaces. This week PENSON’s pick is all about infusing your office space (or where you spend every day) with something different because PENSON is all about letting creativity run wild whilst keeping a free flowing environment.

The fashion houses Chanel, Dior & Prada didn’t disappoint with an eclectic mix of inspiringly different ideas:

Dior Homme opted for a large snaked metal rollercoaster with multicoloured lights – an effect reminiscent of fairground lights. The inspiration behind this was capturing the feel of an amusement park at dusk – when the fun starts. Any sort of lighting that breaks the mould is great in any space and adds another dimension, especially if it’s coloured lighting.

dior-homme-Dezeen

dior-homme-Dezeen

Image credits: Dezeen

Dior Femme featured brilliant white walls with sections painted a warm honey gold that shimmered in the light. The effect was simultaneously undone and polished chic, with a bit of Parisienne townhouse thrown in. The end result was an incredibly light and airy space that made the rooms look bigger than they were. Any free wall space you have would be perfect for this easy paint effect. Just create a blend of square shapes and overlay them using the same colour. If you’re bold enough then draw it down onto the floor too for an increased effect.

Dior

Dior

Image credits: Chanel

Chanel had a much more relaxed theme than previous years with a workshop catwalk complete with cardboard boxes and packaging on display. It essentially looked like the workshop had opened up for an impromptu show. There was a sense of raw creativity and heritage played out in the scenes. This is great if your office also happens to be your workshop so you can make use of your artisan setting. Strip back any office themes and make use of any raw materials. If you have an office and workshop then try not to keep them separate – combine elements in each to really create a comfortable space that speaks the language of your work.

Chanel

Image credits: NowFashion