Last month’s London Fashion Week shows brought some striking newcomers to the fashion scene but it was the most creative set designs that we were keeping an eye on. Limited in space but high in impact, the set design of a catwalk show is just as important as the clothes. The set marries the clothes with artistically placed surroundings perfectly to produce an outright showstopper. Not only useful for predicting the next season colour trends and styles, the set design at LFW is an inspirational art show in itself. Swap the clothing for furniture and you’ve got a perfect mood board for your personal space.

These are the set designs that caught our eye…
Dusky candyfloss pink still rules the roost and Ryan Lo chose one of the best London venues to showcase his sugary and floaty dresses: Sketch.
©FWO

©FWO

 

©FWO

©FWO

Richard Quinn opted for muted floral walls akin to your granny’s house to set off his unique clashing floral designs:
©IMAXTREE.COM

©IMAXTREE.COM

Pink shiny perspex, graffiti, old TVs and worn floors were the backdrop to sequined dresses at Halpern:
©INDIGITAL

©INDIGITAL

 

©INDIGITAL

©INDIGITAL

 

©Getty

©Getty

The new Fyodor Golan collection used space odyssey and abstract flight travel with globes dotted along the runway to emphasise the other-worldly nature of the collection:
Fyodor Golan Fall Winter 2018 Ready-to-Wear Milan Fashion Week © Catwalking.com 'One Time Only' Publication

Fyodor Golan Fall Winter 2018
© Catwalking.com
‘One Time Only’ Publication

 

Fyodor Golan Fall Winter 2018 Ready-to-Wear Milan Fashion Week © Catwalking.com 'One Time Only' Publication

Fyodor Golan Fall Winter 2018
© Catwalking.com
‘One Time Only’ Publication

 

Fyodor Golan Fall Winter 2018 Ready-to-Wear Milan Fashion Week © Catwalking.com 'One Time Only' Publication

Fyodor Golan Fall Winter 2018
© Catwalking.com
‘One Time Only’ Publication

Industrial looks and an unexpected commercial kitchen was the scene at Molly Goddard with commercial roller shelves as the centrepiece:
©NATASHA COWAN

©NATASHA COWAN

©Vogue

©Vogue

Harking to material elements and tailoring, Richard Malone used his sumptuous set design to illustrate the raw materials and the process of work that goes into creating clothes. If you’re in an office that deals with the making and creating of your products then it’s always the best policy to artfully showcase your materials and techniques:
©LFW.COM

©LFW.COM

©LFW.COM

©LFW.COM

 

To match the grandeur of the dresses on show, Ederm opted for the National Portrait Gallery to showcase their collection:
©WWD/Rex/Shutterstock

©WWD/Rex/Shutterstock

As lovers of old and new architecture, we loved seeing David Koma‘s backdrop of the minimal, expertly pared-down stunning show set in a 300-year-old London church. This set was simple but effective: the models paraded through the humble settings whilst adorned with luxe detailing and fabrics:
©FWO

©FWO

 

©FWO

©FWO